Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium

 

 

Students supported by pupil-premium funding achieve better than is typically found nationally  -  OFSTED 2014

The aim of Pupil Premium funding is to reduce the gap between students eligible for Pupil Premium and those who are not. 

At Beaumont School, our principles and strategy for using Pupil Premium Funding are as follows:

  1. The school ensures that a designated senior leader, an Assistant Headteacher, plus the Headteacher and Senior Leadership team have a clear overview of how the funding is being allocated and the difference it is making to the outcomes for pupils.
  2. The school reports to the governing body on a termly basis regarding the progress, behaviour and attendance of the pupils.
  3. The school also ensures that class and subject teachers know which pupils are eligible for pupil premium so that they can take responsibility for accelerating their progress.
  4. The interventions we have set up are to tackle a range of issues, e.g. attendance, behaviour, factors outside school.  Therefore, the school focuses on INSET on supporting pupils, effective teaching and learning, strong careers information, advice and guidance, literacy and numeracy support, targeted subject support, post-mock exam booster classes, good facilities for supported self-study, mentoring, counselling and further enrichment.
  5. Sutton Trust Research shows that one of the most effective interventions is related to meta-cognition and self-regulation.  At Beaumont School we are proud of our ‘Skills for Success’ (S4S) programme which supports students to develop the skills they need to learn and for later life.  These ‘Skills for Success’ are taught through a varied tutor time programme, which is regularly reviewed, and through the whole curriculum.  In addition, Curriculum Enrichment Days throughout the school year are themed around a different aspect of the ‘S4S’ programme.  These skills are often those that may have been missing from home lives, when disadvantage occurs, so it is important that they are taught in school.
  6. Sutton Trust Research shows that one of the most effective interventions is related to meta-cognition and self-regulation.  At Beaumont School we are proud of our ‘Skills for Success’ (S4S) programme which supports students to develop the skills they need to learn and for later life.  These ‘Skills for Success’ are taught through a varied tutor time programme, which is regularly reviewed, and through the whole curriculum.  In addition, Curriculum Enrichment Days throughout the school year are themed around a different aspect of the ‘S4S’ programme.  These skills are often those that may have been missing from home lives, when disadvantage occurs, so it is important that they are taught in school.
  7.  Feedback has also been shown to have one of the most positive impacts on student progress.  At Beaumont we have an effective and differentiated feedback system that allows all learners to make good progress and learn how to improve their work.
  8. We allocate our best teachers to teach our KS4 Maths and English booster sessions.
  9. The school thoroughly analyses the performance and progress of students in all subjects, with a particular focus on English, Maths and Science.  Regular monitoring takes place at both department and pastoral level, with senior leaders monitoring that suitable interventions are in place.
  10. The school never confuses eligibility for Pupil Premium with low ability and supports students to achieve the highest levels possible.
  11. The school draws on the latest research and works with relevant bodies outside the school to ensure that we are drawing on advice and best practice in supporting those pupils eligible for Pupil Premium.

 

 

Government expectations

In April 2010, the Government introduced the Pupil Premium.   This additional funding was allocated to children from low-income families who were known to be eligible for Free School Meals in both mainstream and non-mainstream settings and children who had been in Local Authority Care continuously for more than six months.  The Government believes that the Pupil Premium, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for Free School Meals and their wealthier peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most.  For the academic year 2010-11, the school received £488 per eligible pupil; it has risen to £935 per pupil with the eligibility criteria expanded to include pupils from Service families and pupils who do not currently receive Free School Meals but have done so previously within the past six years.  This provision is known as ‘Ever-6’.  For those students who are under the care of the local authority or have been adopted from care on or after 30 December 2005, the school receives up to £1900 to support their progress.

Pupil Premium Funding

It is intended that the reporting of Pupil Premium spending will demonstrate the extent to which it has had a positive impact on the learning, engagement or well-being of its recipients, while ensuring that no individual pupil or group of pupils is identifiable.  It should also be noted that many benefits of funded activities are not easily quantifiable and that it is rarely possible to identify a comparative outcome resulting from a lack of spending against which to measure the impact of the provision of additional resources.

For the academic year 2015-16, Beaumont received £71, 420 (£7026 of Pupil Premium funding to raise the attainment of its pupils in local authority care), its pupils currently receiving Free School Meals and pupils who had received Free School Meals within the past six years ( ‘Ever6’ ).

The accounting of how this additional money has been spent is divided into two areas:

  • Targeted spending, where money has been used to fund specific resources or strategies to promote the learning, engagement or well-being of individual pupils;
  • Disaggregated spending, where the cost of a resource provided for Pupil Premium recipients as well as pupils not receiving this additional funding has been split between these two categories on a pro rata basis. 

Intervention

Proposed 2015/16 Pupil Premium Component

Actual Pupil Premium Spend 2015/16

Impact of spending

Counselling/Mentoring

£7,000

£3.180

Improved attendance and wellbeing (counselling and nurture)

Attendance Improvement Officer

£1,710

£3,307

 Increased ability to work with families who are finding it difficult to improve their child’s attendance independently.  Only PP students required AIO intervention in 2015-2016, therefore entire cost of service attributed to PP budget.

Alternative provision for KS4 Students

£1,000

£1,070

ASDAN programme, as an alternative to more academic subjects.
Alternative provision at a different establish for part of the week to meet needs of that student.

KS4 English/Maths 1:1 support and Specialist Staffing

£7,500

£12, 690

Two extra lessons per week to work on either Maths or English.  The impact has been improvements from mock exam to real GCSE result in both English and Maths.

Summer school (funded from ‘catch-up’ budget)

n/a

n/a

n/a

Targeted Support (including KS3) Literacy Withdrawal, Specialist teaching)

£40,000

£41, 117

 Increased confidence in reading and writing, which can be applied across the curriculum.  Improved reading and spelling ages.  Support with harder texts and styles of writing to support English attainment.

Educational visits

£5,000

£5271

 Increased social confidence.  Full access to the curriculum for study visits and field trips. College visits to have a greater awareness of future educational possibilities.

Music fees

£1500

£1584

 Enrichment to build confidence and allow access to GCSE courses, such as Music.

Mentoring

 

£8037

Targeted mentoring by staff and 6th form (training of 6th form required), depending on need.  Support to create and follow revision timetables, careers advice and guidance.  Staff mentoring has proved more successful with girls than boys.

1-1 Tuition, (Pupil Premium Plus)

 

£2190

Weekly and fortnightly 1-1 tuition in English, Maths and Science for our CLA.  Targeted one-off support with specific coursework requirements, as requested by subject leaders.

Total

£63,710

£78,446

Please note that the full amount of Pupil Premium funding is not fully budgeted for so that we have the flexibility to respond to student needs, as they arise.

We spend more than the allocated funding through our provision of withdrawal classes in KS4 and KS5 and our TA support in many lessons.

 

The above information does not take into account expenses linked to planning, preparation and administration of targeted support, although some staffing ‘on costs’ have been included where they are identifiable.  Some of the budget is held back to allow us to pay for opportunities for our students as they arise and as need becomes apparent.

 

Assessment of Impact

This is broadly divided into two areas:

  • Case Studies are used to document the impact of single or multiple interventions upon the engagement, learning and well-being of individual pupils.  These are not published as they would make the recipients of Pupil Premium funding identifiable.  Anonymised case studies are part of the reporting to governors.  Indicators of positive impact include: improved academic performance resulting from inclusion in a study trip; improved attendance as a result of intervention from the Attendance Improvement Officer or counsellor; improved behaviour, engagement or reported well-being as a result of support from the school counsellor, mentoring or outreach workers; improved participation in school events and extra-curricular activities.
     
  • Academic indicators, such as progress towards an aspirational upper quartile target or an improvement in performance across termly assessments, will be calculated for groups of pupils at the end of the academic year.  This will measure the impact of interventions such as 1:1 tuition, Learning Support withdrawal groups and other mechanisms of targeted support in Literacy and Maths.

An annual report of how the previous year’s Pupil Premium funding has been spent, along with the rationale behind the allocation of resources and the impact they have had on pupils’ learning, engagement and well-being will be made to the Community, Teaching & Learning Committee of the Governing Body and published on the school website during the Autumn Term.

 

Exam Performance of Students Eligible for Pupil Premium Funding – Summer 2016

In the 2015/16 cohort of Year 11 students, 17 were eligible for Pupil Premium Funding to support their progress at school.  The performance of those students is shown below:
 

  • Attainment 8 was 4.55.
  • Progress 8 was 0.07
    Follow this link to find out more about what Progress and Attainment 8 are and how they are calculated.
  • 47% achieved 5 A* - C including English and Maths (67% in 2014, 53% in 2015)
    National figures for pupil premium students achieving 5A*-C including English and Maths was at 36% for 2015, based on RAISEonline. 
  • 29% achieved A*-C in the EBacc subjects (Maths, English, Science, a Humanity and a MFL)
  • 71% made three levels of progress in English from Key Stage 2 (80% in 2014, 67% in 2015)
  • 53% made three levels of progress in Maths from Key Stage 2 (73% in 2014, 60% in 2015)
     

Proposed Pupil Premium and Pupil Premium Plus Budget (based on 85 (DfE list) students) for 2016/2017:

Expected income: £79, 955  = Total DfE money received.  (plus estimated £7500 Pupil Premium + for CLA.

Category

Budget 2016/17

Targeted Support

£42,000

Mentoring/Counselling

£9,705

Attendance Improvement

£3050

Educational Trips and Visits

£5,000

Music Tuition (sessions)

£1,200

Alternative Provision for KS4 Students

£1000

English and Maths Booster

£12,000

1-1 Tuition

£3500

Targeted support, as identified during the academic year.  Personalised to the students.

£10,000

Total

£74,750

 

Our Pupil Premium Strategy is reviewed annually in November.